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So you're not gonna hire a quant?... (44.54)

Mafee: So you're not gonna hire a quant?

Taylor: I am not going to hire a quant. That's become clear to me. And you're correct. Billy Beane never won a World Series. But Theo Epstein did, using all the same strategies Billy came up with first, and we will, too. I accept I can't go outside to find what we need, so we're going to build our own. I'm going to oversee it.

William Lamar Beane III (born March 29, 1962) is a former American professional baseball player and current front office executive. He is the executive vice president of baseball operations and minority owner of the Oakland Athletics of Major League Baseball (MLB); he is also minority owner of Barnsley FC of EFL League One. From 1984 to 1989 he played in MLB as an outfielder for the New York Mets, Minnesota Twins, Detroit Tigers, and Oakland Athletics. He joined the Athletics' front office as a scout in 1990, was named general manager after the 1997 season, and was promoted to executive vice president after the 2015 season. A first-round pick in the MLB draft by the Mets, Beane failed to meet the expectations of scouts, who projected him as a star. In his front-office career, Beane has applied statistical analysis (known as sabermetrics) to baseball, which has led teams to reconsider how they evaluate players. He is the subject of Michael Lewis's 2003 book on baseball economics, Moneyball, which was made into a 2011 film starring Brad Pitt as Beane.

Theo Nathaniel Epstein (born December 29, 1973) is an American baseball executive serving as the President of Baseball Operations for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB). Epstein became the youngest general manager (GM) in the history of MLB, when the Boston Red Sox hired him at the age of 28 on November 25, 2002. In 2004, the Red Sox won their first World Series championship in 86 years and won another championship in 2007. On October 21, 2011, he resigned from his job in Boston to become President of Baseball Operations for the Chicago Cubs; in 2016, the Cubs won their first World Series championship in 108 years.