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No Fudgie?... (46.23)

Ben Kim: Do you know what this is about? 

Mafee: Somebody's birthday. We're all getting a Fudgie the Whale.

Ben Kim: I'm 99 percent sure you're lying. But the one percent is bursting with hope.

Wags: All right. In what I can only pray will not be a regular occurrence, Bill Stearn will take a page from the Otis Redding songbook and try a little tenderness.

Dollar Bill: Yeah, um okay. Compliance is to be complied with. Ari Spyros is a human man worthy of the respect due to any freeholder. And I apologize for the remarks I made to and about him. Oh, my god.

Ben: No Fudgie?

Fudgie the Whale.png

Fudgie The Whale is this cake.

Otis Ray Redding Jr. (September 9, 1941 – December 10, 1967) was an American singer, songwriter, record producer, arranger, and talent scout. He is considered one of the greatest singers in the history of American popular music and a seminal artist in soul music and rhythm and blues. Redding's style of singing gained inspiration from the gospel music that preceded the genre. His singing style influenced many other soul artists of the 1960s. During his lifetime, his recordings were produced by Stax Records, based in Memphis, Tennessee.

"Try a Little Tenderness" is a song written by Jimmy Campbell, Reg Connelly, and Harry M. Woods. It was first recorded on December 8, 1932, by the Ray Noble Orchestra (with vocals by Val Rosing). Ted Lewis (Columbia 2748 D) and Ruth Etting (Melotone 12625) had hits with it in 1933. Bing Crosby also recorded it on January 9, 1933 for Brunswick Records. The song appears in Dr. Strangelove (1964) and Pretty in Pink (1986).

A popular version in an entirely new form was recorded by soul artist Otis Redding in 1966. Redding was backed on his version by Booker T. & the M.G.'s, and Stax staff producer Isaac Hayes worked on the arrangement. Redding's recording features a slow, soulful opening that eventually builds into a frenetic R&B conclusion, incorporating elements from the Duke Ellington–Lee Gaines song "Just Squeeze Me (But Please Don't Tease Me)" as well as the words "sock it to me." It peaked at #25 on the Billboard Hot 100. It has been named on a number of "best songs of all time" lists, including those from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. It is in the 204th position on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 greatest songs of all time. A live version performed in 1967 at the Monterey International Pop Festival was also recorded.