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Doobies? Doobie Brothers?... (13.28)

Porter: You used to think that it was so easy", you used to say that it was so easy. But you're trying, you're trying now.

Chuck: Doobies? Doobie Brothers?

Porter: Gerry Rafferty. My first job was writing record reviews You remember stuff. I'll tell you what else I remember: You didn't take me down to Baker Street when you could've. If you had, we could come to an agreeable compromise now over milkshakes and handjobs. But you didn't.

Chuck: I get that your ass is chapped, Lucien.

Porter: When you were US Attorney, you dealt your goods all over the place. But not to me.

Chuck: You wanna go to Baker Street, baby, we'll go now. Tell me how I can serve you.

The Doobie Brothers are an American rock band from San Jose, California. The group has sold more than 40 million albums worldwide. It has been active for five decades, with its greatest success in the 1970s. The band's history can be roughly divided into three eras. From 1970 to 1975 it featured lead vocalist Tom Johnston and a mainstream rock and roll sound with elements of folk, country and R&B. Johnston quit the group in 1975, and was replaced by Michael McDonald, whose interest in soul music changed the band's sound until it broke up in 1982. The Doobie Brothers reformed in 1987 with Johnston back in the fold and are still active, with occasional contributions from McDonald. Every incarnation of the group emphasized vocal harmonies. The Doobie Brothers were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2004.

Gerald "Gerry" Rafferty (16 April 1947 – 4 January 2011) was a Scottish rock singer-songwriter known for his solo hits "Baker Street", "Right Down the Line" and "Night Owl", as well as "Stuck in the Middle with You", recorded with the band Stealers Wheel. Rafferty was born into a working-class family in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland. His mother taught him both Irish and Scottish folk songs as a boy; later, he was influenced by the music of The Beatles and Bob Dylan. He joined the folk-pop group The Humblebums in 1969. After they disbanded in 1971, he recorded his first solo album, Can I Have My Money Back? Rafferty and Joe Egan formed the group Stealers Wheel in 1972 and produced several hits, most notably "Stuck in the Middle with You" and "Star". In 1978, he recorded his second solo album, City to City, which included "Baker Street", his most popular song.

"Baker Street" was released as a single in 1978, it reached #1 in Cash Box and #2 on the Billboard Hot 100, where it held that position for six weeks, behind Andy Gibb's smash "Shadow Dancing". Additionally, it hit #1 in Canada, #3 in the United Kingdom, #1 in Australia, #1 in South Africa, and the top 10 in the Netherlands. Rafferty received the 1978 Ivor Novello Award for Best Song Musically and Lyrically. The arrangement is known for its saxophone riff. In October 2010, the song was recognised by BMI for surpassing five million performances worldwide. It was awarded Gold Certification on two occasions, on 1 April 1978 and 22 July 2013 by the BPI in the UK.