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Posts in 1/01: Pilot
Stanford Then Wharton... (6.06)

Bobby: Who is this?

Danzig: My new analyst.

Bobby: Well, if we hired you, you must be a genius. Yale?

Ben Kim: Stanford, then Wharton.

Bobby: Okay, Stanford-Wharton...

 

Stanford University (officially Leland Stanford Junior University, colloquially the Farm) is a private research university in Stanford, California. Stanford is known for its academic strength, wealth, proximity to Silicon Valley, and places in the  as one of the world's top universities. World university ranking = 3rd.

The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania; also known as The Wharton School or Wharton is the business school of the University of Pennsylvania, a private Ivy League university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Established in 1881 through a donation from Joseph Wharton, the Wharton School is the world's oldest collegiate school of business. Wharton has an acceptance rate of less than 9%, and it only accepts fewer than 5 transfer students annually, making it one of the most selective schools in the world.

And he went to Hofstra... (7.11)

Bobby: Electric Sun is controlled by Kazawitz. He also owns 19.3% of Lumetherm backdoored through his stake in Southern Wind. You see that block trade last Thursday come out of Merrill?

Danzig: Yeah. That was Fortress cashing out their shorts before the merger. Wasn't it?

Bobby: Trade was at 12:52, when everyone was at lunch, which tells me they wanted it to be missed. You guys caught it, which is something, I guess. But you're looking at it backward. Electric Sun's offer was just a ploy to temporarily prop up Lumetherm. Typical Kazawitz play to bail on a loser. He's an animal. The block trade was Kazawitz getting out of Southern Wind, getting out of Lumetherm. He rode the story, now he's out, which means you need to be out. In fact, short. It'll slide to $32 and change after word breaks.

Danzig: Wow. That's a good catch, Axe.

Bobby: My cholesterol's high enough. Don't butter my ass, Danzig. Just get smarter. (To Ben) Your read was good with the information you had. You're new. You'll figure it out. Or you'll be gone.

Ben Kim: Jesus Christ.

Danzig: Yeah… And he went to Hofstra.

 

Hofstra University is a private, non-profit, nonsectarian university in Hempstead, New York. Long Island's largest private college, Hofstra originated in 1935 as an extension of New York University (NYU) under the name Nassau College – Hofstra Memorial of New York University at Hempstead, Long Island. It became independent Hofstra College in 1939 and gained university status in 1963. World university ranking = 401st-500th.

You do not want Mike Tyson in his prime... (10.57)
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Chuck: Bobby Axelrod is Mike Tyson in his prime. And you do not want Mike Tyson in his prime. Remember what happened to the guys who fought him then?

Bryan: Yeah they got their faces pushed in. But eventually he got beat. Buster Douglas knocked him on his ass.

 

Michael Gerard Tyson (born June 30, 1966) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1985 to 2005. He reigned as the undisputed world heavyweight champion and holds the record as the youngest boxer to win a heavyweight title at 20 years, four months and 22 days old. Tyson won his first 19 professional fights by knockout, 12 of them in the first round. He won the WBC title in 1986 after stopping Trevor Berbick in two rounds, and added the WBA and IBF titles after defeating James Smith and Tony Tucker in 1987. This made Tyson the first heavyweight boxer to simultaneously hold the WBA, WBC and IBF titles, and the only heavyweight to successively unify them.

James "Buster" Douglas (born April 7, 1960) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1981 to 1990, and 1996 to 1999. He is best known for his stunning upset of Mike Tyson on February 11, 1990 in Tokyo to win the undisputed heavyweight title. At the time Tyson was undefeated and considered to be the best boxer in the world, as well as one of the most feared heavyweight champions in history due to his domination of the division over the previous three years. The only casino to make odds for the fight (all others declining to do so as they considered the fight such a foregone conclusion) had Douglas as a 42-to-1 underdog for the fight, making his victory, in commentator Jim Lampley's words, "The biggest upset in the history of heavyweight championship fights." Douglas held the title for eight months and two weeks, losing on October 25, 1990 to Evander Holyfield via third-round knockout, in his only title defense.

In Inwood, growing up... (13.13)

Lara: In Inwood, growing up, the only boating we ever did was the Staten Island ferry.

 

Inwood is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, at the northern tip of Manhattan Island, in the U.S. state of New York.

The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry route operated by the New York City Department of Transportation. The ferry's single route runs 5.2 miles (8.4 km) through New York Harbor between the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Staten Island, with ferry boats making the trip in approximately 25 minutes. The ferry operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, with boats leaving every 15 to 20 minutes during peak hours and every 30 minutes at other times. It is the only direct mass-transit connection between the two boroughs. Historically, the Staten Island Ferry has charged a relatively low fare compared to other modes of transit in the area; and since 1997 the route has been fare-free. The Staten Island Ferry is one of several ferry systems in the New York City area and is operated separately from systems such as NYC Ferry and NY Waterway.

The Mouse That Roared... (31.10)

Chuck: Do you know the story about the mouse that starts roaring like a lion…

Spyros: no.

Chuck: It doesn’t end well for the God-damned mouse.

 

Not too sure about this one. There's a Aesop fable about a lion and a mouse. But the mouse doesn't roar in it...

But The Mouse That Roared - which may not be anything to do with it - is a 1955 Cold War satirical novel by Irish American writer Leonard Wibberley, which launched a series of satirical books about an imaginary country in Europe called the Duchy of Grand Fenwick. Wibberley went beyond the merely comic, using the premise to make commentaries about modern politics and world situations, including the nuclear arms race, nuclear weapons in general, and the politics of the United States.

OK, Claude Dancer... (32.28)
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Bryan: You know, I remember when you were my professor, you told us a lawyer's calling was beyond mere recompense. It was to serve the spirit of the law regardless of gain.

Orrin: Yeah. It is. Until it's not.

Bryan: What?

Orrin: You'll see. Once you sell out and play for the defence, too.

Bryan: Nah I’ve found my calling.

Orrin: OK, Claude Dancer. One day you'll be coming to me just like this, asking for a job.

 

Claude Dancer was a high-powered prosecuter from the Attorney General's office, a fictional character played by George C. Scott in the 1959 movie, Anatomy of A Murder.

Like Warren Buffet says... (32.30)

Bryan: Like Warren Buffet says, you put a police car on anyone’s tail for 500 miles, he’s gonna get a ticket.

 

Warren Edward Buffett, born August 30, 1930, is an American business magnate, investor, and philanthropist who serves as the chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway. He is considered one of the most successful investors in the world and has a net worth of US$84 billion as of June 3, 2018, making him the third wealthiest person in the world.

May as well be that fraud... (44.08)

Bobby: Well, If it’s gonna be anyone it may as well be that fraud. We’re sharing the stage at the delivering Alpha Conference this week.

 

Annual U.S. finance world conference hosted by CNBC. A who’s who of the investor community with leading asset manager and institutional investors offering candid views along with illustrious political and economic commentators appearing in short segments moderated by CNBC talent and editors.

You’re from round here... (45.55)

Mike Dimonda: I only ever went egging once. Biggest house in the neighborhood and they never gave out any candy, so they deserved it. We destroyed that place.

Bobby: Once? You're an altar boy. That was every halloween for me. You’re from round here, right?

Mike Dimonda: yeah, Grand Concourse. Then White Plains

Bobby: Yeah me too. Well, Yonkers, but it wasn’t nice back then.

 

The Grand Concourse (originally known as the Grand Boulevard and Concourse) is a major thoroughfare in the borough of the Bronx in New York City. It was designed by Louis Aloys Risse, an immigrant from Saint-Avold, Lorraine who had previously worked for the New York Central Railroad and was later appointed chief topographical engineer for the New York City government.

White Plains is a city in Westchester County, New York, United States. It is the county seat and commercial hub of Westchester, an affluent suburban county just north of New York City that is home to almost one million people. White Plains is located in south-central Westchester, with its downtown (Mamaroneck Avenue) 25 miles (40 km) north of Midtown Manhattan.

Yonkers is the fourth most populous city in the U.S. state of New York, behind New York City, Buffalo, and Rochester. The population of Yonkers was 195,976 as enumerated in the 2010 United States Census and is estimated to have increased by 2.5% to 200,807 in 2016. It is an inner suburb of New York City, directly to the north of the Bronx and approximately two miles (3 km) north of the northernmost point in Manhattan.