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I'm getting one... (5.43)

Dr. Gilbert: No, the Fulbright is a capstone, the Marshall is for real scholars.

Gilbert’s son: Both prestigious, though? 

Dr. Gilbert: Yeah. Absolutely!

Gilbert’s son: I'm getting one

Gilbert’s daughter: I'm getting one too.

Dr. Gilbert: Oh. Well, I'm gonna get some more ice cream. Does anybody want some?

The Fulbright Program, including the Fulbright–Hays Program, is one of several United States Cultural Exchange Programs whose goal is to improve intercultural relations, cultural diplomacy, and intercultural competence between the people of the United States and other countries through the exchange of persons, knowledge, and skills. It is one of the most prestigious and competitive fellowship programs in the world. Via the program, competitively-selected American citizens including students, scholars, teachers, professionals, scientists and artists may receive scholarships or grants to study, conduct research, teach, or exercise their talents abroad; and citizens of other countries may qualify to do the same in the United States of America. The program was founded by United States Senator J. William Fulbright in 1946 and is considered to be one of the most widely recognized and prestigious scholarships in the world. The program provides 8,000 grants annually.

capstone course, also known as capstone unit or a senior thesis or senior seminar serves as the culminating and usually integrative experience of an educational program. A capstone course, module, project, subject, or unit in the higher education context may also be referred to as a capstone experience, senior seminar (in the U.S.), or final year project or dissertation (more common in the U.K.).

The Marshall Scholarship is a postgraduate scholarship for "intellectually distinguished young Americans [and] their country's future leaders" to study at any university in the United Kingdom. Created by the Parliament of the United Kingdom in 1953 as a living gift to the United States in recognition of the generosity of Secretary of State George C. Marshall and the Marshall Plan in the wake of World War II, the goal of the scholarship was to strengthen the Special Relationship between the two countries for "the good of mankind in this turbulent world." The scholarships are awarded by the Marshall Aid Commemoration Commission and are largely funded by the British Government. With nearly 1,000 applicants in recent years, it is among the most selective graduate scholarship for Americans, with an acceptance rate around 4%, and as low as 3.2% in 2015. It is widely considered one of the most prestigious scholarships for U.S. citizens, and along with the Fulbright Scholarship it is the only broadly available scholarship available to Americans to study at any University in the United Kingdom.